The Roll and Shuffle      PokerPulse home     Twitter
The Roll and Shuffle - the discriminating player's guide to the art of gambling.
LegalAtPokerPulse - A law blog featuring the best links and guides to Internet gambling key challenges plus a You Asked Us forum where experts answer questions from gamblers and would-be online operators worldwide.
Punters
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    The Roll and Shuffle Forum Index -> The Roll and Shuffle
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
editor
Site Admin


Joined: 09 Nov 2003
Posts: 2940

PostPosted: Fri Apr 15, 2005 12:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gambling royals:

The Economist
April 9/05




Consider for a moment Prince Charles of Wales:

Quote:
By historical standards, Charles has endured his purgatory with grace. Others who were forced to wait as long, such as George IV and Edward VII, spent their days gambling, carousing and bed-hopping. In a few decades' time, expect deferential press coverage of Charles III, together with opinion polls showing that most people would prefer the succession to skip the unpopular, middle-aged Prince William and pass directly to a fresh-faced grandchild. (From Gentleman in waiting at p. 48).


Oh, why do they crap so on poor Chuck, whose only crime was in tactfully, quietly scrapping his pop tart for an adult female he has apparently adored for donkey's years. Cups up, says the 'pulse.


Last edited by editor on Wed Dec 07, 2005 9:11 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
editor
Site Admin


Joined: 09 Nov 2003
Posts: 2940

PostPosted: Fri Apr 15, 2005 1:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A Midsummer Night's Dream
Based on the play by You-know-who
DVD




What - a bluffing bard? Maybe, at least according to this take on the immortal send-up. Those were definitely cards and poker chips at the fairy free-for-all. Quite a pleasant version, this, with just enough punters to cover for one or two Yank fakers - especially this one - ugh! Only in America.

Link to this entry
http://pokerpulse.com/news/viewtopic.php?p=2175#2175


Last edited by editor on Fri Dec 28, 2007 1:11 pm; edited 3 times in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
editor
Site Admin


Joined: 09 Nov 2003
Posts: 2940

PostPosted: Fri Jun 03, 2005 12:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Angel's Command
Hardcover
By Brian Jacques




Quote:
Ned began tugging Ben toward the table, passing a message. "Let's see if we can't pick up a coin or two over yonder."

The crews of two pirate ships, the Diable Del Mar and La Petite Marie, were watching their captains gambling. Rocco Madrid, master of the Diablo, was winning, and Raphael Thuron, master of La Petite Marie, was losing, heavily. Rocco's sword, a fine blade of Toledo steel with a silver basketed handle, lay on the table. Behind it was an ever-growing pile of gold coins from many nations. The Spanish captain played idly with his long, grey-streaked black curls, smiling thinly as he watched Thuron. "Make your choice, amigo, where is the pea?"

Sighing heavily, Thuron looked from the dwindling pile of coins, which were stacked behind the blade of his cutlass on the opposite side of the table. He bit his lip and concentrated his gaze on the three walnut shells, while Rocco Madrid drummed his fingers on the tabletop.

"I am not hurrying you, amigo. Shall I take my siesta while you try to find our little friend the pea, eh?"

The Diablo's crew chuckled appreciatively at their captain's witty observation. The more gold Thuron lost, the slower and more deliberate he became.
The French captain spoke without looking up from the three nutshells. "Huh, the little pea might be your friend, but she's no friend o' mine, not after ten losses in a row!"

Rocco twirled his waxed moustache, enjoying his opponent's discomfiture. "Who knows, the little pea, she might change her mind and fall in love with you. Choose, amigo."

Thuron made a snap decision. He turned up the shell that lay in the centre of the three. It was empty, no pea lay under it. A cheer went up from the Diablo's crew, and groans from men of La Petite Marie. Thuron separated five stacks of gold coins from his meagre pile, swiping them toward the Spaniard with the back of his hand. (From the chapter, La Petite Marie, at pgs. 9-10)


Lovable Liverpudlian Jacques leaves his famous Redwall rodents to their abbey holes this time for a journey along the ancient path of ill-fated sailors:

Quote:
The legend of the Flying Dutchman is known to all men who follow the seafaring trade. Captain Vanderdecken and his ghostly crew, bound by heaven's curse to sail the world's vast oceans and seas, for etermity! The curse was delivered by the angel of the Lord, who descended from the firmament to the very deck of the doomed vessel. Vanderdecken and his evil crew were bound, both living and dead, to an endless voyage. Only two were to escape the Flying Dutchman - a mute, ragged orphan boy, Ben, and his faithful dog, Ned. They were the only two aboard who were pure of heart, innocent of all wickedness. (From the opening page)


Thus begins the latest tale in another wonderful series we won't mind reading aloud to the kiddies, although Jacques' Audio CDs with full cast and music are among the best of the genre, in our view.

The Angel's Command
With Full Cast
CD Audio




Link to this entry
http://pokerpulse.com/news/viewtopic.php?p=2222#2222


Last edited by editor on Fri Dec 28, 2007 1:08 pm; edited 5 times in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
editor
Site Admin


Joined: 09 Nov 2003
Posts: 2940

PostPosted: Sat Jun 18, 2005 7:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mike and Psmith
Paperback
By P.G. Wodehouse




Quote:
Psmith, leaning against the mantelpiece, discoursed in a desultory way on the day's happenings -- the score off Mr. Downing, the undeniable annoyance of that battered bowler, and the probability of his venting his annoyance on Mike next day.

"In theory," said he, "the manly what-d'you-call-it of cricket and all that sort of thing ought to make him fall on your neck tomorrow and weep over you as a foeman worthy of his steel. But I am prepared to bet a reasonable sum that he will give no ju-jitsu exhibition of this kind. In fact, from what I have seen of our bright little friend, I should say that, in a small way, he will do his best to make it distinctly hot for you, here and there." (From Chapter XII, The Singular Behavior of Jellicoe, at p. 78).

Rather more boys and cricket than we care for but such was Plum in his somewhat fruity salad days.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
editor
Site Admin


Joined: 09 Nov 2003
Posts: 2940

PostPosted: Sat Jun 18, 2005 7:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Money For Nothing
Paperback
By P.G. Wodehouse




Quote:
He drifted past the Martyrs' Memorial, and, picking his way through the traffic, drew up at the door of the Clarendon. He alighted stiffly, and stretched himself. And as he did so, something caught his attention out of the corner of his eye. It was his cousin Hugo, climbing down from the dickey.

"A very nice run," said Hugo with satisfaction. "I should say we made pretty good time."

He radiated kindliness and satisfaction with all created things. That John was looking at him in rather a peculiar way, and apparently trying to say something, he did not seem to notice.

"A little refreshment would be delightful," he observed. "Dusty work, sitting in dickeys. By the way, I got on to Pat on the 'phone before we left, and there's no need to hurry. She's dining out and going to the teatre to-night."

"What!" cried John, in agony.

"It's all right. Don't get the wind up. She's meeting us at eleven-fifteen at the Mustard Spoon. I'll come on there from the fight and we'll have a nice home evening. I'm still a member, so I'll sign you in. And, what's more, if all goes well at the Albert Hall and Cyril Warburton is half the man I think he is and I can get some sporting stranger to bet the other way at reasonable odds, I'll pay the bill."

"You're very kind!"

"I try to be, John," said Hugo modestly. "I try to be. I don't think we ought to leave it all to the Boy Scouts." (From Chapter 3, Hugo Does His Day's Good Deed, at p. 38).
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
editor
Site Admin


Joined: 09 Nov 2003
Posts: 2940

PostPosted: Sat Jun 18, 2005 1:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
Book IV of VII
Hardcover
By J.K. Rowling




What?! Harry Potter a four-flusher?! No, but the elder brother Weasleys aren't shy of a flutter. Here they are at the Quidditch World Cup somewhere in Britain:

Quote:
'Everyone,' Mr Weasley continuted, 'this is Ludo Bagman, you know who he is, it's thanks to him we've got such good tickets--'

Bagman beamed and waved his hand as if to say it had been nothing.

'Fancy a flutter on the match, Arthur?' he said eagerly, jingling what seemed to be a large amount of gold in the pockets of his yellow and black robes. 'I've already got Roddy Pontner betting me Bulgaria will score first - I offered him nice odds, considering Ireland's front three are the strongest I've seen in years - and little Agatha Timms has put up half shares in her eel farm on a week-long match.'

'Oh...go on, then,' said Mr Weasley. 'Let's see...a Galleon on Ireland to win?'

'A Galleon?' Ludo Bagman looked slightly disappointed, but recovered himself. 'Very well, very well...any other takers?'

'They're a bit young to be gambling,' said Mr Weasley. 'Molly wouldn't like --'

'We'll bet thirty-seven Galleons, fifteen Sickles, three Knuts,' said Fred, as he and George quickly pooled all their money, 'that Ireland win -- but Viktor Krum gets the Snitch. Oh, and we'll throw in a fake wand.'

'You don't want to go showing Mr Bagman rubbish like that --' Percy hissed, but Bagman didn't seem to think the wand was rubbish at all; on the contrary, his boyish face shone with excitement as he took it from Fred, and when the wand gave a loud squawk and turned into a rubber chicken, Bagman roared with laughter.

'Excellent! I haven't seen one that convincing in years! I'd pay five Galleons for that!'

Percy froze in an attitude of stunned disapproval.

'Boys,' said Mr Weasley under his breath, 'I don't want you betting...that's all your savings...your mother --'

'Don't be a spoilsport, Arthur!' boomed Ludo Bagman, rattling his pockets excitedly. 'They're old enough to know what they want! You reckon Ireland will win but Krum'll get the Snitch? Not a chance, boys, not a chance...I'll give you excellent odds on that one...we'll add five Galleons for the funny wand, then, shall we...'

Mr Weasley looked on helplessly as Ludo Baman whipped out a notebook and quill and began jotting down the twins' names.

'Cheers,' said George, taking the slip of parchment Bagman handed him and tucking it away into the front of his robes. (From Chapter Seven, Bagman and Crouch, at pgs. 81-82)


Quote:
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
Audio CD
Narrated by Jim Dale
,



Quote:
Dale does all the voices and remembers who's who in the extraordinary cast of characters. In fact, he holds a Guiness World Record for most character voices in an audio book.


Quote:
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
Audio CD
Narrated by British actor, novelist, comedian and
poetry enthusiast Stephen Fry




Quote:
Irish Times reviews of Fry's work on the UK Harry Potter audio books have been unabashedly ebullient. Sadly, publishers across the pond have not released his efforts here. No complaints about Dale but it would be thrilling to hear Fry as the evil Voldemort.


Quote:
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
DVD




Quote:
The bigger the book - and these are BIG for kids' books - the less effective the movie in this seven-part series so far. Nevertheless, each is an eloquent learning support for advanced ESL students. Posh British accents throughout a cast of the island's best and brightest. Each film appears to have been a labor of love.


Link to this entry
http://pokerpulse.com/news/viewtopic.php?p=2237#2237


Last edited by editor on Fri Dec 28, 2007 12:46 pm; edited 3 times in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
editor
Site Admin


Joined: 09 Nov 2003
Posts: 2940

PostPosted: Wed Jul 20, 2005 2:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Girl in Blue
Paperback
By P.G. Wodehouse




Quote:
Ernest Simms's manner took on the portentousness which always came into it when he gave evidence in court.

'It has been drawn to my attention that he inaugurates games of chance at the Goose and Gander, contrary to the law. When I warned him that if he persisted in these practices I should be compelled to take steps, he called me an opprobrious name.'

Having given his audience time to shudder, he resumed, and it seemed to Crispin that he was changing the subject, for his next words took the form of a statement that yesterday had been his mother's birthday.

'She lives at Hunstanton in Norfolk, and I always send her a telegram on her birthday.'

Crispin continued fogged. At the sentiment behind this filial act nobody could cavil, for a policeman's best friend is admittedly his mother, but he could think of nothing to say except possibly that it did him credit. He remained silent.

'I went into the post office, leaving my bicycle propped up outside, and despatched my telegram, and when I came out...' Here Ernest Simms paused and seemed to choke, as if, man of chilled steel though he was, his feelings had become too much for him. 'And when I came out,' he repeated, conquering his momentary malaise, 'there was that butler giving young Marlene Hibbs a bicycle less on my bicycle.' (p. 72)


Vintage Wodehouse, a thing, as the poet Keats would say, of beauty and a joy forever.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
editor
Site Admin


Joined: 09 Nov 2003
Posts: 2940

PostPosted: Wed Jul 27, 2005 1:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Aunts Aren't Gentlemen
Paperback
By P.G. Wodehouse


Quote:
More Aunts.

Aunt Agatha, the worst offender.





Quote:
(Shimmering Jeeves, the soul of patience, explains to his thick charge, Wooster, the role of training in the competitive world of athletic achievement). ... 'Rigid attention to training is essential.'

Well, he didn't need to tell me that. An old hand like myself knows how vital rigid training is for success on the turf. I have not forgotten the time at Aunt Dahlia's place in Worcestershire when I had a heavy bet on Marlene Cooper, the gardener's niece, in the Girls' Under Fifteen Egg and Spoon race on Village Sports Day, and on the eve of the meeting she broke training, ate pounds of unripe gooseberries, and got abdominal pains which prevented her showing up at the starting-post. (p. 42)


Link to this entry
http://pokerpulse.com/news/viewtopic.php?p=2262#2262


Last edited by editor on Tue Oct 27, 2009 10:14 am; edited 6 times in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
editor
Site Admin


Joined: 09 Nov 2003
Posts: 2940

PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2005 10:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Country Living
British Edition

Magazine Subscription
20 ways your lottery ticket
benefits the countryside

By Jane Taylor
May, 2005


Quote:
From restoring historic woodlands and waterways to creating cycle routes and walking trails, money from The National Lottery is helping to breathe new life into rural Britain. (Subhead above the lushly illustrated copy at p. 99)


A gorgeous publication on which to rest one's word-weary eyes.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
editor
Site Admin


Joined: 09 Nov 2003
Posts: 2940

PostPosted: Sat Oct 29, 2005 3:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Summer Lightning
Paperback
By P.G. Wodehouse

(Our personal favorite)



Quote:
...From Sir Gregory Parsloe-Parsloe, of Matchingham Hall, to grey-headed pillars of Society in distant Cumberland and Kent, whole droves of respectable men who in their younger days had been rash enough to chum with the Hon. Galahad were recalling past follies committed in his company and speculating agitatedly as to how good the old pest's memory was.

For Galahad in his day had been a notable lad about town. A beau sabreur of Romano's. A Pink 'Un. A Pelican. A crony of Hughie Drummond and Fatty Coleman; a brother-in-arms of the Shifter, the Pitcher, Peter Blobbs and the rest of interesting but not strait-laced circle. Bookmakers had called him by his pet name, barmaids had simpered beneath his gallant chaff. He had heard the chimes at midnight. And when he had looked in at the Old Gardenia, commissionaires had fought for the privilege of throwing him out. A man, in a word, who should never have been taught to write and who, if unhappily gifted with that ability, should have been restrained by Act of Parliament from writing Reminiscences. (From the chapter entitled, Trouble Brewing at Blandings, at p. 20)


Quote:
The Chimes at Midnight
VHS




Henry V
DVD

Based on the masterpiece by the bard in which
Falstaff, played by Robbie Coltrane,
delivers the timeless line
.



Last edited by editor on Wed Dec 07, 2005 9:01 pm; edited 2 times in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
editor
Site Admin


Joined: 09 Nov 2003
Posts: 2940

PostPosted: Fri Nov 11, 2005 5:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dancing in the Wind
Poetry and Art of the British Isles
Hardcover
By Charles Sullivan


Quote:
More about Sam Johnson and
his famous biographer at Single Malt
and Other Good Scotch
.




Quote:
One-and-Twenty
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784)

Long expected one-and-twenty,
ling'ring year, at length is flow:
pride and pleasure, pomp and plenty,
Great ******, are now your own.

Loosen'd from the minor's tether,
free to mortgage or to sell,
wild as wind, and light as feather,
bid the sons of thrift farewell.

Call the Betsies, Kates, and Jennies,
all the names that banish care;
lavish all your grandsire's guineaus,
show the spirit of an heir.

All that prey on vice and folly
joy to see their quarry fly:
there the gamester, light and jolly,
there the lender, grave and sly.

Wealth, my lad, was made to wander,
let it wander as it will;
call the jockey, call the pander,
bid them come and take their fill.

When the bonny blade carouses,
pockets full, and spirits high --
What are acres? What are houses?
Only dirt, or wet or dry.

Should the guardian friend or mother
tell the woes of wilful waste,
scorn their counsel, scorn their pother; --
you can hang or drown at last!

(-- p. 42)


Another fine art/poetry collection by Sullivan, who has an eye for imagery and whose taste frequently reflects our own, which is why we buy all his books. The best of the series, though, is:

Quote:
Loving
Poetry and Art
Hardcover
By Charles Sullivan


Quote:
View two of our favorites
at Losing Streak
.




Link to this entry
http://pokerpulse.com/news/viewtopic.php?p=2332#2332


Last edited by editor on Tue Feb 05, 2008 4:31 pm; edited 4 times in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
editor
Site Admin


Joined: 09 Nov 2003
Posts: 2940

PostPosted: Wed Dec 07, 2005 3:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great Expectations
Audio CD
By Charles Dickens
Narrated by Hugh Laurie




Quote:
`There was another in with Compeyson, as was called Arthur -- not as being so chrisen'd, but as a surname. He was in a Decline, and was a shadow to look at. Him and Compeyson had been in a bad thing with a rich lady some years afore, and they'd made a pot of money by it; but Compeyson betted and gamed, and he'd have run through the king's taxes. So, Arthur was a dying, and a dying poor and with the horrors on him, and Compeyson's wife (which Compeyson kicked mostly) was a having pity on him when she could, and Compeyson was a having pity on nothing and nobody.

`I might a took warning by Arthur, but I didn't; and I won't pre- tend I was partick'ler -- for where 'ud be the good on it, dear boy and comrade? So I begun wi' Compeyson, and a poor tool I was in his hands. Arthur lived at the top of Compeyson's house (over nigh Brentford it was), and Compeyson kept a careful account agen him for board and lodging, in case he should ever get better to work it out. But Arthur soon settled the account. The second or third time as ever I see him, he come a tearing down into Compey- son's parlour late at night, in only a flannel gown, with his hair all in a sweat, and he says to Compeyson's wife, ``Sally, she really is up- stairs alonger me, now, and I can't get rid of her. She's all in white,'' he says, ``wi' white flowers in her hair, and she's awful mad, and she's got a shroud hanging over her arm, and she says she'll put it on me at five in the morning.'' (From Chapter 42 at Literature.org)


Not surprisingly, Bertie Hugh Wooster, does a tip-top job on all the different voices from gentle Joe the blacksmith to the grateful convict Magwich, adding new lustre to some of Dickens's best characters. A wonder.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
editor
Site Admin


Joined: 09 Nov 2003
Posts: 2940

PostPosted: Wed Dec 07, 2005 3:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Something Fishy
Paperback
By P.G. Wodehouse




How is it, wonders a reduced Lord Uffenham, that butler-cum-landlord Keggs has outlived all his previous employers and managed to purchase a large estate on a particularly pleasant acreage in Surrey?

Quote:
"But wasn't Jack Dempsey a heavyweight?"

"Of course he was, and so a dozen voices told him. But he would stick to it that he only weighed ten stone four, and bobs were produced on every side by those who thought they were on a safe thing and placed in the custody of the landlord, who was appointed arbiter. 'I'm sorry, Mr. Keggs,' he said, 'but I'm afraid I must decide against you. Jack Dempsey weighed over thirteen stone when he won the heavyweight championship from Jess Willard.' And was Keggs taken aback? Not a bit. Did he exhibit pique? Or chagrin? Not a trace. 'Oh that Jack Dempsey?' he said with one of those faint, tolerant smiles. 'I was not referring to him. Naturally I meant the original Jack Dempsey, the Nonpareil.' And he pulled out a book -- yerss, he had it in his pocket -- and read out where it said about how it is interesting to remember that the fighting weight of Jack Dempsey the Nonpareil was only a hundred and forty-four pounds with tights on. Well, there was a pretty general outcry, as you can imagine, with those present hotly demanding their bobs back, but the landlord had no option but to award the stakes to Keggs, and he cleaned up as much as fifteen shillings and sixpence. He told me, when we were walking home, that he had made a steady income for thirty years out of that piece of chicanery. So now perhaps you'll agree that he's deep and dark and wants watching." (-- pgs. 24-25)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
editor
Site Admin


Joined: 09 Nov 2003
Posts: 2940

PostPosted: Tue Dec 20, 2005 5:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quite Honestly
Hardcover
By dear Sir Jack Falstaff Mortimer
, friend to women, small animals
and children of nine.



Quote:
'So what're you going to do?' Chippy had changed over the time I'd been away. He looked older, but he was much smoother. No longer the Chippy who'd say 'Fuck off, man' to any woman. He had the self-satisfied smile of a successful person.

'I suppose get some sort of job,' I told him, a bit uncertainly.

'What sort of job?' Not much use with your convictions.' Chippy spoke from a lofty height, as though he had the cleanest character ever, which was far from the truth. 'You work along with me, Terry, and you could live like me.' Here he waved his hand round the Beau Brummell Club as though he owned the whole place. There were tables with girls with dickie bows round their bare necks and naked shoulders who were dealing out cards and raking in money. There were fruit machines clattering round the walls. In and out of the shadows round the bar there were easy-to-come-by women and men straining the buttons on their dark suits. I heard a few posh voices piping excitedly away and I thought, this is where the tip-top people come to mix with crims. (-- p. 22)

Another fun-filled Wodehouse-like romp with London villains, a dotty bishop and young praeceptor Lucy Purefoy, who only wants to do a bit of good to poor Terry home from a four-year stretch for theft courtesy of the mad Bull Bullingham.

Anyone in London in June, 2006 who doesn't see heartthrob Derek Jacobi in Sir John's excellent play, Voyage Round My Father, wants his fruitcake sorted.

Voyage Round My Father
VHS
Based on Mortimer's personal account of
life with father, a blind barrister
who tried to conceal his disability to
the peril of his wife and son
.

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
editor
Site Admin


Joined: 09 Nov 2003
Posts: 2940

PostPosted: Thu Jan 12, 2006 4:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Hitchcock Signature Collection
Suspicion
DVD




Gary Grunt is a penniless bounder whose taste for the finer things leads him to the nearest racetrack and, unbelievably, to dull, insipid Joan Fontaine, who doesn't seem to believe it either. The only thing saving this dog is dear bumbling Nigel Bruce as Beaky Thwaite, Grunt's sucker pal, who succumbs suspiciously to a slurp of vicious Parisian brandy.


Last edited by editor on Thu Feb 16, 2006 4:56 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    The Roll and Shuffle Forum Index -> The Roll and Shuffle All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next
Page 2 of 5

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
GoldMinerPulse
LegalAtPokerPulse
The Roll and Shuffle
Online Gaming Public Companies


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group

 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   FAQFAQ   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in