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PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2008 12:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kootenai Brown
Canada's *Unknown Frontiersman
Paperback
By William Rodney




Quote:
Just how Brown lost his money he never said. The cost of mining operations and commodities were certainly factors. During the summer of 1862, for example, The British Colonist, July 22, 1862, reported that shovels and axes sold for $10; coffee fetched $1.50 per pound; flour retailed at $70 per hundredweight; and whisky, the standard antidote for sickness, injury and despair, brought $12 to $18 per gallon, quality and strength unknown. With the advent of winter transportation costs rose, commodities grew scarcer and prices in the winter settlement around Williams Lake rose proportionately. Apart from the high prices for commodities or necessities, there were other ways of losing money. The temptations of gambling and strong drink were ever present, but at least one saloon in Williams Lake provided an additional innocuous attraction in the form of billiards at a dollar game. The British Colonist, September 10, 1862, offers another possibility, and simultaneously reveals the wide social variations characteristic of a wide open frontier community:

Quote:
The prostitutes on the creek - nine in number - put on great airs. They dress in male attire and swagger through the saloons and mining camps with cigars or huge quids of tobacco in their mouths, cursing and swearing and looking like anything but the angels in petticoats heaven intended they should be. Each has a revolver or bowie knife attached to her waist, and it is quite a common occurrence to see one or more women dressed in male attire playing poker in the saloons, or drinking whisky at the bars. They are degrading set, and all good men in the vicinity wish them hundreds of miles away. (-- p. 47)


Quote:
* Note: For a guy who's supposed to be unknown to Canada, Kootenai does pretty well. To wit, his Pioneer Village in Pincher Creek, Alta., opened by the country's Chief Justice, a boost from the Manitoba Historical Society on his exploits in the Red River Valley and a significant entry here on his role as the first park warden of Waterton Lakes.


Oh, yes:

Quote:
Kootenai Brown
Also titled,
Showdown at Williams Creek
Directed by Allan Kroeker
VHS




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PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2008 11:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Vanity Fair
Magazine Subscription,
A Legend with Legs
The secret crush of generations of male moviegoers, Angie Dickinson walked into Hollywood history as the Rat Pack's gal pal, kicking off a 10-year affair with Frank Sinatra, playing his wife in the original Ocean's Eleven, and catching the eye (if not more) of J.F.K. Now 76, Dickinson talks to Sam Kashner about her marriage to Burt Bacharach, the tragedy of their daughter's struggle with Asperger's, and an erratic but memorable career - including the groundbraking cop show Police Woman and her classic reverse striptease in Dressed to Kill
January, 2008




Quote:
Dickinson's most enduring passion may be poker. "I played every Saturday night instead of going to Daisy, or whatever was popular at the time," she says. Regular Sunday-night games at the Sinatras included Jack Lemmon and his wife, the Sammy Cahns, and the Gregory Pecks, although Sinatra himself never liked to play. "Frank never played poker," Dickinson explains. "Frank's game was the dice. He'd be going great at the crap tables, but he was an impatient man," and he liked the continual action of craps and baccarat. "Dean Martin was a professional poker player" at one time in his hometown of Steubenville, Ohio, she says, "but he got into a lot of trouble, and they broke his hands."The reason poker is so popular now, she believes, "is that they play Texas Hold 'Em. You've heard of the dumbing down of America? This is the dumbing down of poker."

Johnny Carson, who was a close friend for many years, was a "a great cardplayer. He was an amateur magician."... (-- pg. 134)


Ocean's Eleven
DVD
Featuring Angie and the Rat Pack




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PostPosted: Fri Jan 18, 2008 3:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

British Homes & Gardens
Magazine Subscription
Her movements tell a story for which no language has words
May, 2005


Quote:
More on the happy outcome of that coin toss at the PokerPulse Gambler's Guide to Shakespeare.





Quote:
Yuan-Yuan Tan's destiny rested on the flip of a coin. Heads, she followed the traditional Chinese path of her father's choice. Tails, she pursued her mother's dream and would attend the Shanghai Dance School. Luckily, that coin set the young dancer's career in motion. Her jaw-dropping performances have captivated audiences and judges at international competitions around the world. Today, Yuan-Yuan is a principal dancer with the San Francisco Ballet, and articulates what she does best:

"Ballet is not only about technique, but it is the way you move that tells the story."

(From a Rolex ad, p. 10)


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 18, 2008 4:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good Time Girls
of the Alaska-Yukon Gold Rush
Hardcover
By Lael Morgan




Quote:
"That night she (Cad Wilson) sure acted happy. Why, she danced so light her feet hardly touched the floor at all. The fellows went mad when she was singing 'There'll Be a Hot Time in the Old Town Tonight.' That's when they really began throwing nuggets on the stage. Cad had a little laugh that was different. She'd sing a while and then she'd look around and laugh. She used her dress for holding nuggets just like it was sort of an apron and she held it right high in front of her. Cad was smart. She'd gone up there like all the rest of us because whe wanted to get all the gold she could. She done alright for herself, too." (footnote omitted)

One admirer was so smitten with Cad that he paid a waiter to fill a bathtub with wine, purchased at twenty dollars a bottle, for her bath in. Yukon writer Pierre Berton guesses Cad did not allow him to watch or scrub her back, but probably had the stuff rebottled. (footnote omitted)

In the fall of 1899, Cad focused on one fellow who spent more than $75,000 on her, but she still couldn't resist an easy mark. Too typical is her fleecing of a low-paid workman known only as "The Sawdust King" because he made his living changing the sawdust used to insulate the floors of Dawson gambling houses. He routinely lost most of his meager earnings at the gaming tables. Finally he moved up to packing water for a bar, and in an uncharacteristic streak of luck at cards parlayed his first day's wages into something over $1,800 by 3 p.m. the next day. (-- pgs. 73-74)


Quote:
Even more curious is the story of Rose Blumkin, who, although not an entertainer, won the hearts of the Klondike Kings and made them pay. ... Unable to act or sing, Rose signed on a the Monte Carlo (Saloon) as a dance hall girl. Later she became a ticket-taker, so good at the job that one newspaper favorably reviewed her performance at the ticket window along with the show.

... Caught in the Dawson fire that destroyed the Monte Carlo in January of 1900, Rose declared the loss of $3,500 in personal property, at least $1,000 more than any of the stage stars wiped out by the blaze.

When Rose saved enough to vacation in Cincinnati in 1899, one of her admoirers expressed doubts she would return, so she wagered him a wine supper that she'd be back by October 20. Delayed by the wreck of the SS Stratton which she'd been traveling, Rose lost the bet but gamely comandeered a dog team to mush home and settle the account. "The bet will be paid off Thursday," noted Dawson columnist Stroller White, "but an ardent admirer of the comely Rose will insist on settling the tab." (footnote omitted) (-- p. 77)


Quote:
In covering a brawl at the Pavillion following the loss of $3,100 by one of the proprietors in a blackjack game, a reporter noted delicately that two dance hall girls involved called each other "names that would not be tolerated in polite society." (-- p. 86)


Quote:
There is a great deal of gambling done here. It is a common sight to see in the saloons with gambling halls and dance halls attached, the females (who operate in the dance rooms at $1 per dance) sitting at the card tables, stud horse poker, blackjack or faro are the principal ones, or standing at the roulette table, cigarette in mouth, and playing away for pretty high stakes," reported John McDougal, a well-traveled mining man in an 1899 letter to a friend.

"I don't see how in the world these girls stand the racket. ..." (-- pgs. 101-102)


Quote:
Unfortunately, Corrine (B. Gray)'s press coverage usually meant trouble, for which she had as strong a penchant as she did for alcohol. And teamed with A.C. Stearns, a diminutive, sixty-five-year-old former physician known as the "Gambler Ghost," she sometimes outdid herself. "Doc" Stearns had broken the bank at Monte Carlo, so he was sually treated with deference, but together they made both the Klondike Nugget Semi-Weekly and the Dawson police blotter on September 27, 1899.

According to that account, "Doc" Stearns, a blasé habitué of the gambling houses and variety halls, and Corrine B. Gray, one of the airy fairies of Dawson's half-world, were ejected from the stage at the Opera House on Monday night... (-- p. 126)


Quote:
On arriving in Nome, Blanche Lamonte and her lover, C.B. Heath, alias the 'Hobo Kid,' invested in a gambling house and saloon called the Kid's Club. (footnote omitted) Blanche was so determined to make her fortune that when a no-good named Flory Wynkoop attempted to steal her stake, she trashed him severely enough to make newspaper headlines. She remained single and apparently did well in Nome. (footnote omitted) (-- pgs. 160-161)


Quote:
Another good time girl, a prostitute known only as "Japanese Mary," prospered when she bet $1,000 on the prowess of Jujiro Wada, a fellow Japanese immigrant, who won a winter marathon on Nome's enclosed track. She invested her winnings in grubstaking prospectors and when one made a rich strike, threw a lavish party at a Nome roadhouse that was talked about for years. (-- p. 167)


Quote:
"I happened into one of the leading saloons and gambling joints in Juneau in 1897 at the beginning of the Klondike rush. Dan McGrew, one of the most prominent gamblers of the camp, was dealing far, while Lou watched the game as his 'capper," [someone who helps players mark their bets with coin-like copper cap,"] Dr. Sugden recalled. "The door opened and a tall stranger with matted beard and bare at the throat came in the door. He was a striking figure of a man."

Dr. Sugden's version much resembles Robert Service's. The stranger ordered a couple of rounds of drinks and noted the "Rag Time Kid" was at the bar, so he sat down on the Kid's piano stool and gave a wonderful concert. "The rattle of chips ceased and he held the crowd spellbound," Dr. Sugden recounted. "He ran the gamut from the classics to rag and ended with a wild and crashing Russian overture."

Then, true to Robert Service, the stranger sprang from his still and faced the crowd. "There's a dirty hound from hell in this crowd and I came here tonight to kill him," he declared, looking squarely in the eyes of Dan McGrew, who quietly drew his revolver. The bartender, accustomed to gunplay, turned out the lights to ruin the aim of the combatants. Both McGrew and the stranger died in the shoot-out that followed, and Dr. Sugden recalled seeing "the lady that was known as Lou" take a poke of gold dust from the pocket of the stranger, just as the lights flashed on. (-- p. 269)


Quote:
The Spell of the Yukon and Other Verses
Paperback
By Robert W. Service




Songs of a Sourdough
Paperback
By Robert Service




The Shooting of Dan McGrew

A bunch of the boys were whooping it up in the Malamute saloon;
The kid that handles the music-box was hitting a rag-time tune;
Back of the bar, in a solo game, sat Dangerous Dan McGrew,
And watching his luck was his light-o'-love, the lady that’s known as Lou.
When out of the night, which was fifty below, and into the din and glare,
There stumbled a miner fresh from the creeks, dog-dirty, and loaded for bear.
He looked like a man with a foot in the grave and scarcely the strength of a louse,
Yet he tilted a poke of dust on the bar, and he called for drinks for the house.
There was none could place the stranger’s face, though we searched ourselves for a clue;
But we drank his health, and the last to drink was Dangerous Dan McGrew.
There’s men that somehow just grip your eyes, and hold them hard like a spell;
And such was he, and he looked to me like a man who had lived in hell;
With a face most hair, and the dreary stare of a dog whose day is done,
As he watered the green stuff in his glass, and the drops fell one by one.
Then I got to figgering who he was, and wondering what he'd do,
And I turned my head — and there watching him was the lady that’s known as Lou.
His eyes went rubbering round the room, and he seemed in a kind of daze,
Till at last that old piano fell in the way of his wandering gaze.
The rag-time kid was having a drink; there was no one else on the stool,
So the stranger stumbles across the room, and flops down there like a fool.
In a buckskin shirt that was glazed with dirt he sat, and I saw him sway,
Then he clutched the keys with his talon hands — my God! but that man could play.
Were you ever out in the Great Alone, when the moon was awful clear,
And the icy mountains hemmed you in with a silence you most could hear;
With only the howl of a timber wolf, and you camped there in the cold,
A helf-dead thing in a stark, dead world, clean mad for the muck called gold;
While high overhead, green, yellow, and red, the North Lights swept in bars? —
Then you've a hunch what the music meant . . . hunger and might and the stars.
And hunger not of the belly kind, that’s banished with bacon and beans,
But the gnawing hunger of lonely men for a home and all that it means;
For a fireside far from the cares that are, four walls and a roof above;
But oh! so cramful of cosy joy, and crowded with a woman’s love —
A woman dearer than all the world, and true as Heaven is true —
(God! how ghastly she looks through her rouge, — the lady that’s known as Lou.)
Then on a sudden the music changed, so soft that you scarce could hear;
But you felt that your life had been looted clean of all that it once held dear;
That someone had stolen the woman you loved; that her love was a devil’s lie;
That your guts were gone, and the best for you was to crawl away and die.
'Twas the crowning cry of a heart’s despair, and it thrilled you through and through —
"I guess I'll make it a spread misere," said Dangerous Dan McGrew.
The music almost dies away . . . then it burst like a pent-up flood;
And it seemed to say, "Repay, repay," and my eyes were blind with blood.
The thought came back of an ancient wrong, and it stung like a frozen lash,
And the lust awoke to kill, to kill . . . then the music stopped with a crash,
And the stranger turned, and his eyes they burned in a most peculiar way;
In a buckskin shirt that was glazed with dirt he sat, and I saw him sway;
Then his lips went in in a kind of grin, and he spoke, and his voice was calm,
And "Boys," says he, "you don't know me, and none of you care a damn;
But I want to state, and my words are straight, and I'll bet my poke they're true,
That one of you is a hound of hell . . . and that one is Dan McGrew."
Then I ducked my head and the lights went out, and two guns blazed in the dark;
And a woman screamed, and the lights went up, and two men lay stiff and stark.
Pitched on his head, and pumped full of lead, was Dangerous Dan McGrew,
While the man from the creeks lay clutched to the breast of the lady that’s known as Lou.
These are the simple facts of the case, and I guess I ought to know.
They say that the stranger was crazed with "hooch," and I'm not denying it’s so.
I'm not so wise as the lawyer guys, but strictly between us two —
The woman that kissed him — and pinched his poke — was the lady known as Lou.

(From The Spell of the Yukon and Other Verses. [Also published in Britain under the title, Songs of a Sourdough by Robert W. Service. Publishers: Barse & Co. New York, N.Y., Newark, N.J.. Copyright, 1916 by Barse &&038; Co. [expired in the USA])


Quote:
"The most printable explanation of the Oregon Mare' (Edith Neile) s nickname was that she whistled and squealed like a horse when she was dancing, but it was said that she had other equine talents as well. She was one of the best-known girls in town - a big, handsome woman who made men get off the sidewalk when when she walked by," recalled Klondike writer Pierre Berton, drawing on stories he'd heard from old-timers. "Seldom short of funds, she would, when in an expansive mood, stand up at the bar and cry: 'Here, boys - there's my poke. Have a drink with me."

...Ex-senator from California Jeremiah Lynch reported watch Edith spend $1,000 in one hour at the roulette table. It is also legend that the Mare kicked customers who refused to dance with her, that she had been an Oregon cowgirl, that she drank as wildly as she gambled, and that she was estranged from her kin. (-- p. 300)


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 2008 4:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Testament of Youth
Hardcover
By Vera Brittain


Quote:
More of the book.

More of Vera's early push for equal opportunity for women.

More on Canadian soldiers killed in the two World Wars.





Quote:
The subsequent course of my entire future probably depended upon the mere chance that something - perhaps my guardian angel, perhaps nothing more romantic than the warmth gradually restored to my icy limbs by the stuffiness of the lecture-room in which we we working - suddenly made me decide to "stick out" the ordeal for which I had prepared at such cost of combat and exasperation, and to make the best of the job that had begun so badly. So, frantically seizing my pen, I started to write; any nonsense, I felt, was better than the blank sheets that would so forlornly typify my failure of imagination and courage.

All through the days of the examination, in spite of the three or four quickly-made friends with whom between papers I ate large teas in the town, I felt an unadapted alien to an extent that privately filled me with shame, and remember still the ludicrous shock from which I suffered after first meeting two or three of my terrifying competitors from East End or north-country High Schools. Probably no other girl who came up to take the Somerville Scholarship papers in 1914 had been reared to be quite such a sensitive plant as myself, or so securely sheltered in the greenhouse warmth of bourgeois comfort and provincial elegance. My mother's conscientious standards of cooking and cleanliness were, and are, about the most exacting that I have ever encountered, while at St. Monica's, with its tasteful decorations and gracious garden, its appetising meals and large staff of servants, its limited number of fashionable pupils from homes far wealthier than my own, a still higher level of luxury had been taken for granted.

Until I spent those four days at Somerville in that freezing March, I had unthinkingly assumed that women's colleges were much the same as men's; Viriginia Woolf had not then written A Room of One's Own to emphasize the sad difference between iced pudding and prunes and custard... (From Provincial Young-Ladyhood at pgs. 75-76)


Testament of Youth
BBC Miniseries
VHS only!




Quote:
Not for the feint of heart, this excellent series based on Vera Brittain's eloquent autobiography provides a rich historical monument to the tragedy of that war, including the devastating effects of mustard gas.


Recommended listening in foreign affairs offices:

Lest We Forget
A collection of poetry & music dedicated to the memory of those who fell in two world wars
Audio CD
Featuring Derek Jacobi, John Gielgud and the BBC Symphony Orchestra




Quote:
Pomp & circumstance: March no. 4 in G major / Elgar -- Lines from For the fallen / Binyon -- On the idle hill of summer / Housman -- In time of the breaking nations / Hardy -- Salut d'amour / Elgar -- The autumn of the world / Read -- The planets: Mars, the bringer of war / Holst -- Attack ; The general / Sassoon -- For the fallen / Binyon -- In memoriam / Thomas -- The dead (IV) / Brooker -- Returning, we hear the larks / Rosenberg -- Everyone sing / Sassoon -- Chanson de matin / Elgar -- On the dead in Gallipoli / Maserfield -- Elegy / Elgar -- Before action / Hodgson -- The soldier / Brooke -- Futility / Owen -- In Flanders Fields / McCree -- Chanson de nuit / Elgar -- The hand that signed the paper / Thomas -- Summer night on the river / Delius -- To a conscript of 1940 / Read -- Watching post / Lewis -- Naming of parts / Reed -- All day it has rained / Lewis -- Peter Grimes: Dawn / Britten -- Song of the dying gunner / Causley -- For Johnny / Pudney -- Planets: Venus, the bringer of peace / Holst -- Midnight, May 7th, 1945 / Dickinson -- Will it be so again? / Lewis -- At the British war cemetery, Bayeux / Causley -- Enigma Variations: Nimrod / Elgar -- And death shall have no dominion / Thomas -- Pomp & circumstance: March no 1 in D major / Elgar -- Lines from For the fallen / Binyon.

Elgard, Edward, 1857-1934.
Holst, Gustav, 1874-1934.
Delius, Frederick, 1862-1934.
Calvert, Phyllis.
Gielgud, John, Sir, 1904-
Orr, Peter.
Jacobi, Derek.
Davis, Andrew, 1944-
BBC Symphony Orchestra.

Includes readings of poetry by Laurence Binyon; A.E. Housman; Thomas Hardy; Herbert Read; Edward Thomas; Rupert Brooke and others.

Should be required listening by governments everywhere contemplating the unoriginal and uncreative decision to go to war. Beautifully edited and executed, this CD must have been a labor of love for all concerned.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 19, 2008 3:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Napoleon of Crime
The Life and Times of Adam Worth, Master Thief
Hardcover
By Ben Macintyre


Quote:
More of the book at the Gambler's Code.





Quote:
The painted lady was Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire, once celebrated as the fairest and wickedest woman in Georgian England. The painter was the great Thomas Gainsborough, who had executed this, one of his greatest portraits, around 1787. A few weeks before the events just recounted, the painting had been sold at auction for 10,000 guineaus, at that time the highest price ever paid for a work of art, causing a sensation. Georgiana of Devonshire, nee Spencer, was once again the talk of London, much as her great-great-great-great-grandniece Dian, Princess of Wales, nee Spencer, would become in our age.

During Georgiana's lifetime, which ended in 1806, her admirers vied to pay tribute to "the amenity and graces of her deportment, her irresistible manners, and the seduction of her society." Her detractors, however, considered her a shameless harpy, a gambler, a drunk, and a threat to civilized morals who openly lived in a menage-a-trois with her husband and his mistress. No woman of the time aroused more envy, or provoked more gossip. (From The Elopement, p. 5)


Quote:
Even by the louche standards of the day, Georgiana's social life was raunchy in the extreme. The hard-living duchess, a determined but hopelessly inexpert gambler, was addicted to the card game faro (at which she lost several fortunes) and thought nothing of drinking and carousing with her companions until dawn, night after night. The playwright Richard Brinsley Sheridan, who captured the antics of the Devonshire House set in his School for Scandal, recalled one particularly unsuccessful evening at the card table when "he had handed the Duchess into her carriage when she was literally sobbing at her losses." Her "early disposition to coquetry," meanwhile, gradually developed into a full-fledged, if only partially observed, reputation for sexual immorality.

The whiff of scandal sprang from two sources. The first was Georgiana's somewhat overenergetic canvassing on behalf of her friend, the Whig politician Charles James Fox, during the bitterly contested Westminster election of 1784. She at once became infamous for trading kisses for votes among the London electorate, behavior which outraged her more straitlaced contemporaries, who regarded kissing common butchers as clear evidence of nymphomania. "When people of rank descend below themselves and mingle with the vulgar for mean and dirty purposes, they give up their claim to respect," sniffed one critic. Another account claimed she was spending up to 600 a day in the Whig interest and getting fairly plastered in the process by "drinking daily since the poll commenced, two pots of purl, a pint of Geneva and a gallon of porter." (From A Great Lady Holds a Reception, p. 91)


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 06, 2008 2:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

From Omens and Lucky Charms:

COUNTRY LIFE
Weekly Magazine Subscription
Spectator
The origin of the furies
By Carla Carlisle
Feb. 15/07


Quote:
More of the PokerPulse Gambler's Guide to Climate Change.





Quote:
On Monday, the 'long-awaited' United Nations report on global warming was published. The result of 2,500 scientists pooling their data, it concluded what everybody but George Bush and Exxon Mobil already knew: that man has truly botched up the planet. Unless we come up with a unity of purpose greater than we've ever achieved, our children are going to pay a terrible price. ...

The UN report was released on the day the first turkeys died in Suffolk. Not that we knew. Nearly a week went by before we heard the news. But by sunset on Saturday, as I shut up my birds, I knew the worst. But it wasn't the 800 dead birds and the prospect of gassing the 160,000 remaining turkeys that caused me to tremble. It was the sight of 27 long sheds stretched across the landscape, and broadcasters calling it a 'farm' in Suffolk. This is no farm, Bernard Matthews is no farmer, and the sheds housing thousands of turkeys are not 'bio-secure' units, but havens for the development of new pandemic viruses.

...

Silent Spring
Paperback
Environmental Classic
By ecology icon Rachel Carson,
the visionary behind the DDT ban




For 30 years, I've carried around my grandfather's copy of Rachel Carson's Silent Spring. A cotton farmer impoverished by the boll weevil, he still stood by Carson: put poison on the fields and you poison the rivers; poison the rivers and you poison the oceans. Carson dedicated her book 'to Albert Schweitzer who said: "Man has lost the capacity to foresee and forestall. He will end by destroying the earth.'"

... I latch onto a few lines in the book's introduction, from a speech by the Duke of Edinburgh in the early 1960s: 'Miners use canaries to warn them of deadly gases. It might not be a bad idea if we took the same warning from the dead birds in our countryside.' (-- p. 100)


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 06, 2008 2:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:

Another 'inconvenient truth': Online gambling is greener and better for the planet. SIGN UP today for our Gamble Green Challenge to help stop global warming!


From Impossible Odds:

British Columbia Magazine
Magazine Subscription
Wilderness warrior Betty Krawczyk
Why British Columbia's feistiest great-grandmother is willing to go to jail for nature.
By Brian Payton
Spring, 2007


Quote:
View Betty's blog for B.C. eco-protest updates.





Quote:
Betty Krawczyk believes that citizens are obliged to speak up when faced with injustice. The 78-year-old grandmother has scolded government, inudstry, and even fellow conservationists in defence of British Columbia's wilderness. Her outspoken manner inspires some, goads others - and has cost her almost two years in cumulative prison terms. (emphasis added)

Krawczyk's remarkable journey has taken her from an impoverished childhood in southern Louisiana to the front lines of B.C.'s environmental movement. While raising her eight children, she found time to pen more than 200 fiction stories in the true-confessions genre ("I was his his love slave") for popular women's magazines - before taking up the cause of the Women's Movement in the late 1960s. During the Vietnam War, she emigrated to Canada after her first son joined the airforce and her second was about to be drafted.

Forty years, four marriages and divorces, eight grandchildren later, the Vanocuver resident is probably best known for her role in the Clayoquot Sound protests of 1993.

On a sunny afternoon, Krawczyk sat down beside an arbutus tree to reflect on her life in B.C.'s environmental movement. Her perch afforded a view of West Vancouver's Eagleridge Bluffs high above Horseshoe Bay, where she and other protesters spent six weeks on a blockade last summer to protest a highway expansion that has since proceeded through the area. ...

Q. What defines a successful campaign?

A. Clayoquot was successful in that is now a biosphere reserve. But it is still threatened, and I may have to go back there. For the moment, it seems all right. The Elaho was a success. It is now protected. The Walbran was not a success. The courts protected the logging companies. ...

Q. Were you ever frightened in your work as an activist?

A. That's a hard one. I guess I'm not frightened. I just take one day at a time.

My biggest worry is for the safety of the people out on isolated blockades. We were in the Walbran for over three weeks. It was very isolated and there had been some bad violence. Young protesters were attacked and it has not been brought to court. I keep in touch with the press and the RCMP; it's the press that keeps violence down. ...

Q. Why can't you work within the system?

A. Primarily, because there is too much money involved.

Corporations buy off the democratic process. They have influence and raw power. So it is very difficult, even in a system like ours, a system that is supposed to be democratic. It's not just our environment that's lost if we don't act decisively - democracy is lost.

So many people think that if they go vote every four years, their duty as a citizen is done. Your duty as a citizen is not done. Your duty as a citizen is to take part in the decisions being made, not to just pick someone else to do it for you...Only we as citizens can make changes. We mustn't depend on government to do it for us. Because they won't. (-- pgs. 52-56)


Two kinds of Canuck justice - depending on the protester:

Yahoo News
Blockade of eastern Ont. rail line ends; protesters warn of further actions
By Allison Jones
April 21/07


Quote:
DESERONTO, Ont. (CP) - A key organizer of an aboriginal blockade, which paralyzed passenger and freight rail traffic on the busy Toronto-Montreal corridor, is warning that the protest that ended early Saturday is just the beginning in a series of "escalating" actions.

"We've identified targets as part of this campaign, one being the railway, one being provincial highways and one being the town (of Deseronto) itself," said Shawn Brant. "The disruption on the CN line was a first in a series of economic disruptions, the first in a campaign." he said. "The campaign calls for an ever escalating degree." The next target has already been chosen and plans to finalize the next action are in the works, said Brant, who commented Saturday morning at the site of contention in the dispute - a gravel quarry that the Mohawks of the Bay of Quinte say is their land.

Though the protesters originally said they would stay at the railway blockade for 48 hours, it ended peacefully after about 30 hours at 6 a.m. Saturday, after a sleepless night of negotiations with provincial police and other officials. Protesters said they chose to end it early over fears of a violent conclusion. A court injunction ordered the protesters and the dilapidated school bus off the tracks with arrests warned as a consequence, but the order was never enforced by police. No arrests have been made at this point, said Ontario Provincial Police Sgt. Kristine Rae. "We're pleased that it was a peaceful resolution." ...

Condominiums are planned using gravel from the quarry for an area known as the Culbertson Land Tract, which is on a section of land given to the Six Nations in 1793. The Mohawks contend they never relinquished any part of it. (emphasis added)

[/quote]

Compare the above with this:

News 1130
Betty Krawczyk sentencing leads to courthouse occupation
By Jim Goddard
March 5/07


Quote:
More about both protests and the different treatment of protesters.

More examples of two-tiered Canuck justice.

More on eco-protests, the Tsawwassen treaty and the wacky way B.C. 'BILLIES protect their priceless pristine wilderness and some of the world's richest agricultural land.


Quote:
Demonstrators upset with a 10-month sentence given to Betty Krawczyk for contempt of court have now occupied the lobby of the Vancouver law courts. Chanting "Shame, shame" and beating drums, a dozen protesters took over the lobby area near the Supreme Court registry office. Sherriffs have lined up to prevent them from entering the office. Betty Krawczyk was sentenced to 10 months in jail for criminal contempt of court for her role in protests against highway construction through the Eagleridge Bluffs in West Vancouver. The 78-year-old environmentalist, who has already spent more than two years in jail for anti-logging protests, has been given another lengthy term in B.C. Supreme Court. Justice Brenda Brown ruled last month that Krawczyk's breach of a court order "was open, continuous and flagrant". And Krawczyk is not being given credit for time already served in jail. (emphasis added)


Betty's lawyer, Cameron Ward told the CBC Early Edition in an interview early in March that the judiciary is wrong to enforce an injunction - a civil remedy intended to keep parties to a dispute in the same position until the dispute is tried - as if the case was in substance a criminal matter.[/quote]

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 17, 2008 9:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

From Omens and Lucky Charms:

New York Times Magazine
Magazine Subscription
She Was Supposed to Be Dead
A Vietnam war correspondent disappears for 23 days
By Maggie Jones
Feb. 24/08




Quote:
When Kate Webb reported from the battlefields of Cambodia, she kept her chestnut hair cropped G.I-short and wore jeans and loose shirts to obscure her breasts. This was 1971. Only a handful of women were full-time correspondents in Vietnam, and even fewer women roughed the front lines next door in Cambodia, where military officers believed foreign women were, at best, a distraction. At worst, they were bad luck.

Bad luck was a virus among foreign-correspondents in Cambodia. Unlike in Vietnam - where Webb arrived four years earlier at age 23 with a philosophy degree, a one-way ticket from Australia, a Remington typewriter, $200 in cash and a whisky-and-cigarette voice so soft people leaned in to hear her - there were no reliable phone lines in Cambodia to call your editor in an emergency. Tehre were no American military hospitals to sew up your bullet wounds; no helicopters to evacuate you when things got bloody. By April 1971, several years before the Killing Fields, at least 16 foreign correspondents were missing and 9 were dead. (-- p. 43)


More about Aussie Kate:

War Torn
Stories of War from the Women
Reporters who Covered Vietnam

By Tad Bartimus, Denby Fawcett, Jurate Kazickas,
Edith Lederer, Ann Bryan Mariano, Anne Morrissy
Merick, Laura Palmer, Kate Webb, and Tracy Wood;
Introduction by Gloria Emerson
Hardcover




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PostPosted: Thu Apr 17, 2008 9:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Economist
Magazine Subscription
A big deal
Poker is getting younger, cleverer,
duller and much, much richer

Dec. 22/07




Quote:
Doyle Brunson (above) is a poker legend. Twice winner of the game's most prestigious annual tournament, the World Series of Poker (WSOP), held in Las Vegas, the cowboy-hat-clad southerner affectionately known as Texas Dolly also wrote what many consider to be the bible of poker theory, Super System: A Course in Power Poker. His reputation among card-shufflers borders on the superhuman. Indeed, after fighting off supposedly terminal cancer in the 1960s, he celebrated his return to the cardrooms with 53 straight wins. Adding to the mystique, both of his World Series titles were won with exactly the same cards: a full house of tens over twos.

Now in his mid-70s, Mr Brunson is still going strong. But not strong enough for Annette Obrestad (above, right), who beat the old master and 361 other entrants in September to win the first ever WSOP event held outside America. Miss Obrestad's victory, which netted her £1m ($2m), shows how much poker has changed since the days when Texas Dolly, Amarillo Slim Preston and Jack “Treetops” Straus held sway. She is only 19 (making her the youngest ever winner of a World Series bracelet) and she is, of course, a woman. She hails from Norway, not Nevada. And though she had previously won over $800,000 in internet tournaments, the event at London's Empire Casino was the first time she had encountered serious opposition in the flesh. The poker press refers to her by her online moniker, annette_15.

Miss Obrestad's route to the grand prize—dumped on the final table in bundles of $50 notes, as is the World Series tradition—required her to see off such modern-day poker luminaries as Chris “Jesus” Ferguson, a hirsute scholar of game theory, Dave “Devilfish” Ulliott, a somewhat less cerebral but wily British professional who wears diamond-encrusted knuckledusters, and Phil “Poker Brat” Hellmuth, arguably the most celebrated (not least by himself) modern player. Jim McManus, a poker player and historian, describes the young Scandinavian's win as a “startling milestone”.

Yet it is also part of a trend. Youngsters are flocking to poker as never before, attracted by its growing cachet and the ever-expanding pots. The plethora of books, blogs and DVDs now easily accessible, and the rapid growth of poker online, means newcomers can learn the art much more quickly than in earlier eras. “When I started out it took years of hard grind at the table to get good. Now the learning curve is much steeper,” says Howard “The Professor” Lederer, a professional player. It is often said that while Texas Hold 'Em, the most popular version of poker, may take only minutes to learn, it takes a lifetime to master. Annette_15 may beg to differ. ...

Poker has long fascinated America's great and good, from politicians to generals to captains of industry. Presidents Roosevelt (both), Truman, Eisenhower and Nixon were all keen players. Nixon was famously good: most of the funding for his first congressional run came from poker winnings. Poker was said to have inspired cold-war tacticians. It is still a useful military motif: recall the playing cards used to represent Saddam Hussein and his most-wanted cohorts. Poker financed a sizeable chunk of Microsoft's start-up costs. Bill Gates once said he learned more about business strategy at the baize than in classrooms - though these days he apparently prefers the more stately game of bridge.

Not all famous players have made such good role models. As he partied away the declining years of his career, Errol Flynn incurred some excruciating poker losses, including, on one particularly bad night, a Caribbean island he had hoped to develop into a holiday resort. John Wayne had some shockers too, though in one memorable game he won Lassie from the canine star's desperate owner.

Getting serious

What Nixon, Flynn and Wayne have made of poker today? They would surely have marvelled at the transformation of "the cheater's game" into a multi-billion-dollar industry, pumping out new millionaires almost daily. Even they might have been shocked at the latest season of "High Stakes Poker," a television series in which players buy into each game for $500, 000 apiece and the winner takes home more than $5m.

They might, perhaps, have been disappointed that the game had lost some of its backroom edginess. Miss Obrestad's generation are more likely to put their excess winnings into tax-free bonds than blow them betting on a single round of gold, as Mr Brunson and his Las Vegas pals used to do in their madder moments. Still, those hoping to win over poker's skeptics will find no better example than young Annette, 19. She is stern, sober and chillingly focused on her game. She appears to be exceptionally good at it too. Either that or amazingly lucky. (-- pgs. 33, 38)


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 17, 2008 10:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Babette's Feast
DVD
By Isak Dinesen


Quote:
More Gambler's Nosh.





This 1998 movie based on one of many masterful short stories by Karen Blixen (aka Isak Dinesen) has everything in it we find worth living for - an obscure seacoast, deep green hills, roan-colored horses with sleighbells, characters who are gentle and kind, a duet from our favorite Mozart opera, a general with a plume and gold braid epaulets who nearly ruins himself at cards, and a visiting chef from a famous Paris cafe -- ooh-la-la![ -- like this one and this one! -- who wins the lottery. What chef Babette does with her winnings becomes the best victory dinner ever recorded on film.

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PostPosted: Fri May 23, 2008 8:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This England
THE MATHEMATICAL GENIUS OF AN
ENGLISH COUNTESS

By Bel Bailey

Summer, 2007




Quote:
The famous Lord Byron fervently hoped that his daughter, Augusta Ada, would never become a poet like himself. His wish was granted as she was destined to become famous for her scientific and mathematical genius instead.

Born in 1815, Ada's parents separated when she was only a few months old and her father left Britain forrever. He never fought his wife Annabella for custody of their child so Ada was brought up by her mother. Unfortunately, she was a harsh and narrowly religious woman who dominated her daughter all her brief life.

Ada was educated privately by tutors and then self-taught. Augustus de Morgan helped her in her advanced studies however. He was first professor of mathematics at London University and developed the theories and techniques behind modern computer programs.

Another early computer pioneer, Charles Babbage, was also introduced to Ada and they became close friends and allies. Learning that he was in the process of designing a revolutionary calculating machine - the first of all computers - Ada eagerly offered to help him.

She was rather an enigma to her friends in society as she was an attractive and high-spirited girl, fond of fashion and dancing, yet sincerely claimed that subjects they regarded as heavy - astronomy, algebra, trigonometry - were "true refreshment!"

By the age of 18 she was very interested in Babbage's machines. Even her marriage two years later, the birth of her three children and her becoming the Countess of Lovelace in 1838, did nothing to diminish that interest.

Ada was one of the first mathematicians to see that Babbage's "Analytical Engine" had tremendous implications and would be one of the great breakthroughs of the century.

An Italian engineer and mathematician, Luigi Federico Menabrea, had written an article on Babbage's invention and this was translated by Ada in 1843, and expanded with her own notes and examples based on computing mathematics.

After publication, Ada's clear explanations were praised as extremely helpful, especially her description of how Babbage's "Analytical Engine" could be programmed to compute Bernoulli numbers. She described the engine "weaving algebraic numbers, just as the Jacquard loom weaves flowers and leaves," an original and striking thought!

Alas, so keen were Babbage and Ada to raise money for this great invention which obsessed them both, and they wanted to develop further, that they created fresh problems for themselves. The pair gambled desperately, working on systems to predict the outcome of horse races. Here they came badly unstuck in an unscientific field. Their money-raising efforts were a disaster and the pair came close to financial ruin.

This worry caused Ada's very robust health to deteriorate and she died at the early age of 37 - just one year older than her father had been at his death.

She had always craved to know her father better and mourned his passing when she was only nine years old. Byron would indeed have been delighted with her fame in a field so different from his own.

Since the time of King John the name Ada had been in the Byron family and today it lives on in a different context. As she was the first computer programmer, the universal programming language developed by the American Defence Department in the 1970s was called Ada in honour of the unique Countess of Lovelace. (-- p. 53)


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PostPosted: Mon May 26, 2008 10:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

From Impossible Odds:

The New York Times Magazine
Magazine Subscription
The Uneven Playing Field
Everyone wants girls to have as many opportunities in sports as boys. But can we live with the greater rate of injuries they suffer?
By Michael Sokolove
May 11/08




Quote:
Girls and boys diverge in their physical abilities as they enter puberty and move through adolescence. Higher levels of testosterone allow boys to add muscle and, even without much effort on their part, get stronger. In turn, they become less flexible. Gorls, as their estrogen levels increase, tend to add fat rather than muscle. They must train rigorously to get significantly stronger. The influence of estrogen makes girls' ligaments lax, and they outperform boys in tests of overall body flexibility - a performance advantage in many sports, but also an injury risk when not accompanied by sufficient muscle to keep joints in stable, safe positions. Girls ten to run differently than boys - in a less-flexed, more upright posture - which may put them at greater risk when changing directions and landing from jumps. Because of their wider hips, they are more likely to be knock-kneed - yet another suspected risk factor.

This divergence between the sexes occurs just at the moment when we increasingly ask more of young athletes, especially if they show talent: play longer, play harder, play faster, play for higher stakes. And we ask this of boys and girls equally - unmindful of physical differences. The pressure to concentrate on a "best" sport before even entering middle school - and to play it year-round - is bad for all kids. They wear down the same muscle groups day after day. They have no time to rejuvenate, let alone get stronger. By playing constantly, they multiply their risks and simply give themselves too many opportunities to get hurt.

...

An A.C.L. does not tear so much as it explodes, often during routine athletic maneuvers - landings from jumps, decelerations from sprints - that look innocuous until the athlete crumples to the ground. After the A.C.L. pulls off the femur, it turns into a viscous liquid. The ligament cannot be repaired; it has to be replaced with a graft, which the surgeon usually forms by taking a slice of the patellar tendon below the kneecap or from a hamstring tendon. One reason for the long rehabilitation is that the procedure is really two operations - one at the site of the injury and the other at the donor site, where the tendon is cut.

...

If girls and young women ruptured their A.C.L.s at just twice the rate of boys and young men, it would be notable. Three times the rate would be astounding. But some researchers believe that in sports that both sexes play, and with similar rules - soccer, basketball, volleyball - female athletes rupture their A.C.L.s at rates as high as five times that of males. (-- pgs. 54-59)


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 04, 2008 3:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

BC Business
Magazine Subscription
Deep Freeze
Joanne "Joey" Freeze is a wife, a mother and a geologist. As president and CEO of a local mioning company, she also happens to be sitting on a promising deposit of copper in northern Peru.
By Susan Hollis
February, 2008


Quote:
More Gambling for Gold.





Quote:
... Freeze’s curiosity for the workings of the earth’s crust was a given from the start. “My dad was in the oil business, so I understood the exploration mentality and pioneering and such,” she says, adding that when she entered the mineral-exploration field, women were not a common entity. “I was very lucky that when I started, it was just the right time when people were realizing that women can do it too. The women who were a little bit older than me definitely had a harder time getting jobs. What surprises me is how few women have come into the end of the business that I’m in, as an executive or running a company… In university we were 25 to 30 per cent women, but it’s not 25 to 30 per cent women in the business end now.”

Graduating from the University of Western Ontario in 1978 with a BA in geography and from UBC in 1981 with a BSc in geology, Freeze cut her teeth in mineral exploration across Northern B.C. and Chile before moving to Peru with her family in 1994. Employed as consultants, she and her husband soon had a keen understanding of the geological bounty to be discovered in the area. ... It was during this period that Freeze met Candente co-founder Fredy Huanqui, who at the time was well known in Peru as the “Inca with a Midas touch.” While working with Freeze for Arequipa Resources Ltd in Peru, Huanqui was a key player in the discovery of a large gold deposit. The find, dubbed Pierina after Huanqui’s daughter, sold to Barrick Gold Corp. for about $1 billion in 1996.

“It was one of those phenomenal discoveries of the day; everybody in the industry was talking about it,” says Freeze. “That kind of ties into one of the misunderstandings of the industry. A lot of people seem to think we go to South America because it’s cheaper to mine there, but we go there because it’s very rich in minerals, and most of the ground hasn’t been walked, so there is still a lot to be discovered.” Roused by the momentum of the Pierina find, Huanqui and Freeze formed Candente in 1997, just in time for mineral prices to plummet. It was during this period that Candente acquired rights for the Cañariaco Norte Copper Deposit in northern Peru. Seven years, 26,000 metres of rock and 82 drill holes later, Candente’s preliminary explorations suggest a significant amount of copper. With improved mineral market prices, the company is now looking at developing the mine single-handedly. Projected costs vary, depending on how the company extracts the copper. It would cost around $142 million to extract the copper through leaching, which has an associated recovery rate of 60 per cent. Milling, which has a recovery rate of 90 per cent, would double the cost. Freeze says they’ll start raising the money through banks and Peruvian pension funds as soon as a feasibility study is wrapped up next year. (-- pgs. 88-95)


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 17, 2008 3:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

From the Will to Win:

Wodehouse on Wodehouse
Autobiography
Including the memoir with Guy Bolton,
Bring On the Girls!

Hardcover




Quote:
In an armchair in the corner there is sitting a man in shirtsleeves, chewing an enormous (unlighted) cigar. He is fifty-five years old and for twenty-five of those years he has been an impresario of musical comedy. Lending to the discussion the authority of long experience and uttering the slogan which he probably learned at his mother's knee, he says, 'Bring on the girls!'

It is the panacea that never fails. It dates back, according to the great Bert Williams, to the days of ancient Egypt.

'When one of those Pharaohs died,' he used to explain to his partner Walker, 'they'd bring in wine - finest wine in the country - and they'd put it beside him. Then they'd bring in rich food that smelled just beautiful an' put that on the other side of him. Then they'd bring on the girls, an' those girls would do the veil-dance. An' if that ole Pharaoh didn't sit right up and take notice then...brother, he was dead.'

The impresario has his way. The girls are brought on.

And how wonderful those girls always were. They did not spare themselves. You might get the impression that they were afflicted by some form of chorea, but the dullest eye could see that they were giving of their best. Actors might walk through their parts, singers save their voices, but the personnel of the ensemble never failed to go all out, full of pep, energy and the will to win. A hundred shows have been pushed by them over the thin line that divides the floperoo from the socko.

It is for this reason that Bolton (Guy) and Wodehouse (P.G.), looking back over their years of toil in the musical comedy salt-mines, raise their glasses and without hesitation or heel-taps drink this toast: To the Girls!

And they feel that the least they can do in gratitude for all their hard work is to honour them in the title of this book. (From Bring on the Girls! at pgs. 9-10)


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