The Roll and Shuffle      PokerPulse home     Twitter
The Roll and Shuffle - the discriminating player's guide to the art of gambling.
LegalAtPokerPulse - A law blog featuring the best links and guides to Internet gambling key challenges plus a You Asked Us forum where experts answer questions from gamblers and would-be online operators worldwide.
Punters
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    The Roll and Shuffle Forum Index -> The Roll and Shuffle
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
editor
Site Admin


Joined: 09 Nov 2003
Posts: 2940

PostPosted: Wed Jan 25, 2006 1:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Churchill and America
Hardcover
By Martin Gilbert




Quote:
On March 4 Churchill went to the White House, where both President Truman and (Admiral) Leahy drove with him to Washinton's Union Station. The three men then boarded a special train for the twenty-four-hour journey to Jefferson City, Missouri. That night, as the train steamed westward, Churchill and Truman played poker. According to another of the players, at about 2:30 a.m. Churchill put down his cards and said: "If I were to be born again, there is one country in which I would want to be a citizen. There is one country where a man knows he has an unbounded future." When his companions asked Churchill to name the country he replied: "The USA, even though I deplore some of your customs." "Which customs," he was asked. "You stop drinking with your meals," Churchill replied. (Footnotes omitted) (-- p. 368)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
editor
Site Admin


Joined: 09 Nov 2003
Posts: 2940

PostPosted: Thu Feb 16, 2006 4:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

MI5
DVD
Episode 2, Season 3




Quote:
Tom (bidding farewell to the recently-ex-CIA Christine in a favorite underground carpark) : Maybe there's a lottery committee somewhere underground, throwing the dice to decide what we'll be day by day -- spy, tramp, hero, traitor.


Yeah, maybe. After that episode, Tom went south and so did the show's edge. Too bad.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
editor
Site Admin


Joined: 09 Nov 2003
Posts: 2940

PostPosted: Wed Nov 29, 2006 4:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Love in a Cold Climate
Based on Nancy Mitford's hilarious 1949 novel
DVD




Quote:
Linda Radlett, shortly before she and galpal Fanny, daughter of the infamous Boulter, prepare to debut at their coming out party, which in this scene is in danger of being short five men: We spent the weeks before the ball in an agony, waiting for our lives to begin. (Shuffling cards and spreading them in a wide circle) If this comes out, I'll marry the man. If this comes out, I'll marry at 18...


Imagine P.G. Wodehouse with a caustic temper and an especially bad case of PMS. Whatever you do, keep your eye on the entrenching tool over the fireplace.

More on the story and the excellent cast at the PBS website.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
editor
Site Admin


Joined: 09 Nov 2003
Posts: 2940

PostPosted: Wed Dec 27, 2006 2:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Henry VIII
DVD




Quote:
(Having quietly and strangely, non-violently, disposed of his astute German wife Anne of Cleves, Henry VIII bellies up to the baise for a quick game of cards).

Hank (admiring an opponent's hand while engaged intermittently in the signing of various death warrants): Hoy! How did he find that card? I thought I was the only man allowed to have four queens!


More on the excellent poker tips offered by Henry's then soon-to-be-fifth-wife Catherine Howard at Famous Women Gamblers.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
editor
Site Admin


Joined: 09 Nov 2003
Posts: 2940

PostPosted: Wed Jan 10, 2007 10:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Man with Two Left Feet
Hardcover
By P.G. Wodehouse




Quote:
"Please do not be quite so idiotic, Bertie. There is one head of the family who is certainly not going to do *it, and that is Gussie. And you are going to America to stop him."

"Yes, but why me?"

"Why you? You are vexing, Bertie. Have you no sort of feeling for the family? You are too lazy to be a credit to yourself, but at least you can exert yourself to prevent Gussie's disgracing us. You are going to America because you are Gussie's cousin, because you have always been his closest friend, because you are the only one of the family who has absolutely nothing to occupy his time except golf and night clubs."

"I play a lot of auction."

"And, as you say, idiotic gambling in low dens. If you require another reason, you are going because I ask you as a personal favor."

What she meant was that, if I refused, she would exert the full bent of her natural genius to make life a Hades for me. She held me with her glittering eye. I have never met anyone who can give a better imitation of the Ancient Mariner.

"So you will start at once, won't you, Bertie?"

I didn't hesitate.

"Rather!" I said. "Of course I will."

Jeeves came in with the tea.

"Jeeves," I said, "we start for America on Saturday."

"Very good, sir," he said; "which suit will you wear?" (From Extricating Young Gussie at pgs. 29-30)


More on how to play Bertie's card game by David Galt at the eclectic Howstuffworks..
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
editor
Site Admin


Joined: 09 Nov 2003
Posts: 2940

PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2007 1:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Partnership
Paperback
By 1992 Booker Prize winner Barry Unsworth




Quote:
Foley directed the thin jet of sealing fluid over the pixies at point-blank range, aiming the spray carefully and with growing viciousness at their grinning identical faces, as though instead of merely closing up their pores he intended to disfugure them for life. He experienced this futile hatred for each new batch, as he neared the end; a rage at their numbers, their sameness, the mechanical accuracy of their reproduction. Tray after tray of them came up to him from his tireless partner Moss below until he sometimes felt an urge, not however so far obeyed, to befoul their plaster composure in some way, by spitting on them usually, though grosser defilements had occurred to him. He had not confided these impulses to Moss and did not intend to, not because of shame, in fact he was rather proud of this dark, elemental side to his nature; he was reticent in the matter because he had come to believe that the less Moss knew about him the better, generally speaking.

It was the last tray he was on, anyhow; this dozen completed the two gross and made up the order. Two hundred and eighty-eight lucky pixies, each sitting grinning on the rim of a mottoed ashtray. All they needed now was the paint; three colours would do the lot as long as they were bright enough. The faces were most difficult: you had to have people to paint them who would follow the intention of the moulding and not attempt to mitigate the hideousness of the features. Usually only an experienced painter of pixies had the necessary self=control. It was, though, essential that the face should retain the leer that holiday-makers demanded, the authentic lucky pixie-look of slightly lecherous domestic complicity that was considered to augur well for the year to come. (Opening paragraphs of another mighty Unsworth novel)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
editor
Site Admin


Joined: 09 Nov 2003
Posts: 2940

PostPosted: Mon Jan 15, 2007 12:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Ministry of Fear
Paperback
By Graham Greene




Quote:
...Arthur Rowe loked wistfully over the railings - there were still railings. The fete called him like innocence: it was entangled in childhood, with vicarage gardens and girls in white summer frocks and the smell of herbaceous borders and security. He had no inclination to mock at these elaborately naive ways of making money for a cause. There was the inevitable clergyman presiding over a rather timid game of chance; an old lady in a print dress that came down to her ankles and a floppy garden hat hovered officially, but with excitement, over a treasure-hunt (a little plot of ground like a child's garden was staked out with claims), and as the evening darkened - they would have to close early because of the blackout - there would be some energetic work with trowels. And there in a corner, under a plane tree, was the fortune-teller's booth - unless it was an impromptu outside lavatory. It all seemed perfect in the late summer Sunday afternoon. 'My peace I give unto you. Not as the world knoweth peace...' Arthur Rowe's eyes filled with tears, as the small military band they had somehow managed to borrow struck up again a faded song of the last war: Whate'er befall I'll oft recall that sunlit mountainside. (Paragraph 2 of BOOK ONE, The Unhappy Man, pgs. 11-12)


A lesser known Greene:

Too Late to Turn Back
Hardcover
By Graham's cousin, Barbara Greene




Quote:
In 1936, Barbara Greene, a twenty-two-year-old, slightly ditzy, naive, and utterly charming Londoner, a socialite some eight or nine years younger than her dour, somewhat secretive, literary cousin, Graham, agreed to join Greene on a walk from Sierra Leone across the vast uncharted jungle of Liberia...She never says why Greene was making this months-long walk through a trackless equatorial jungle, nor does he, but we can guess that that he was on a British espionage mission to observe the movements of Germany's colonial and military operations in West Africa...She kept a journal and made herself into a shrewd, careful, compassionate observer of both her cousin and Liberia...a first-hand, first-rate description of a people and a place that had not been described in detail before by any European...Graham Greene wrote his own version of the trek, Journey Without Maps, in which he mentions his cousin by name only once and, as Paul Theroux points out in his introduction to Too Late to Turn Back, refers to her in passing as "my cousin" barely eleven times in three hundred pages. His book is still very much in print (Penguin). As far as I know, Barbara Greene's much better book was last published (with Theroux's fine introduction) in 1981 by Settle and Bendall (UKI) and is now out of print. The great pleasure is to read them in tandem, his first, then hers. (From Russell Banks' contribution to Lost Classics, a good one for bibliophiles edited by Michael Ondaatje among others, at pgs. 8-10)

View the terrifiying photo essay by Teun Voeten, Liberia, 2003: In the Lion's Mouth, posted January, 2004 at World Press Review.


Lost Classics
Hardcover
Edited by Michael Ondaatje, Michael Redhill,
Esta Spalding and Linda Spalding




Link to this entry
http://pokerpulse.com/news/viewtopic.php?p=2693#2693


Last edited by editor on Mon Sep 10, 2007 10:06 am; edited 3 times in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
editor
Site Admin


Joined: 09 Nov 2003
Posts: 2940

PostPosted: Wed Jan 24, 2007 10:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Country Life
Magazine Subscription
Grate Expectations
By Jessica Fellowes
Feb. 2/07




Quote:
Laying the Perfect Fire

Unfortunately, with endless conversions of houses into flats, not to mention the strict laws on coal smoke introduced in 1952, many of us no longer have working chimneys in our houses. Even if we do, the finding of logs, the carrying of dirty coal and the unpleasant smell of firelighters can be off-putting. Asking people for the 'best' way to lay a fire can create a debate heated enough to start the kindling off. Personally, I think there is nothing like the comforting smell of peat on an Irish fire. But in Britain we must stick to logs - however, the choice is as wide as the different woods which all have burning abilities and smoke effects. Mrs Danvers recommends ash as she says it can be 'burnt young and green, and doesn't spark.' The simplest - and most effective - fire-laying method is crushed newspaper first (but not too much, just a single layer), firelighters to get it started, overlaid with kindling, a lottle coal and a log on top. Burning coal requires less attention once it has got going and gives off a stronger heat. Otherwise, just keep throwing the logs on. You might need to nurture the fire for the first half an hour or so, but it is worth it for the loving warmth it gives back for the whole evening.

Finally, do not forget to have your chimney swept regularly. The best time is in early autumn, just before you start to light the fires again. Find your local recommended sweep at the National Association of Chimney Sweeps. And make sure you shake the sweep's hand for luck! (-- p. 55)


Quote:
An Ode to a Real Fire:

Logs to Burn
Beechwood fires burn bright and clear
If the logs are kept a year:
Stow your beech for Christmastide,
With new cut Holly laid beside.
Chestnut's only good, they say,
If for year's 'tis stored away:
Birch and firewood burn too fast,
Blaze too bright and do not last;
Flames from Larch will shoot up high,
Dangerously the sparks will fly.
But Ashwood green and Ashwood brown
Are fit for a Queen with a golden crown.
Oaken logs, if dry and old,
Keep away the winter's cold;
Poplar gives a bitter smoke,
Fills your eyes and makes you choke;
Elm-wood burns like churchyard mold,
E'en the very flames are cold.
Hawthorn bakes the sweetest bread -
So it is in Ireland said;
Applewood will scent the room,
Pear-wood smells like flowers in bloom,
But Ashwood wet and Ashwood dry
A King may warm his slippers by.

(-- p. 54)


Link to this entry
http://pokerpulse.com/news/viewtopic.php?p=2700#2700


Last edited by editor on Mon Sep 10, 2007 10:01 am; edited 2 times in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
editor
Site Admin


Joined: 09 Nov 2003
Posts: 2940

PostPosted: Tue Apr 17, 2007 10:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Match Point
DVD
Directed by Woody Allen




Quote:
Protagonist tennis player Chris Wilton in a voiceover: The man who said I'd rather be lucky than good saw deeply into life. People are afraid to face how great a part of life is dependant on luck. It's scary to think so much is out of one's control. There are moments in a match when the ball hits the top of the net and for a split second it can go forward or fall back. With a little luck, it goes forward and you win. Or maybe it doesn't, and you lose.


A charmless movie and about as convincing as the notion that a confirmed outsider from New York's Lower East Side could actually infiltrate the inner circle of old money in Britain. Tot'ly out of order, that.

Link to this entry
http://pokerpulse.com/news/viewtopic.php?p=2826#2826


Last edited by editor on Mon Sep 10, 2007 9:59 am; edited 2 times in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
editor
Site Admin


Joined: 09 Nov 2003
Posts: 2940

PostPosted: Wed Jun 06, 2007 1:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The World of Karl Pilkington
Hardcover
By Ricky Gervais




Quote:
Ricky: I don't think nudists are just doing it because they are proud of their knobs.

Karl: No, but there's got to be a little bit of that in it, in't there? You know Jonathan Ross, right, and he's always happy getting his knob out, 'cos he's known to have this big knob, right.

Ricky: What do you mean, 'he's known?' Why is Jonathan Ross known to have this big knob?

Karl: No, he just talks about it a lot, doesn't he? He's always saying, 'Oh I bet you'd like this wouldn't you', and all that.

Steve (Merchant): But that's like me saying I'm known for being a great lover. I say it a lot, it's clearly not the case. What evidence have you got that he's got a big knob?

Karl: I saw it...Well, no, he did get it out but I wasn't looking...

Ricky: What do you mean 'You weren't looking'? How would you know it was out?

Karl: Just because he was sort of moving it about and that, and I could sort of see. No, I wasn't looking though. It was that sort of thing when you can see something moving about but you're like, 'I'm not looking at it."

Ricky: What, like an owl seeing a mouse?

(From 'No, no I was looking at another one.', at pgs. 180-181)


Lotsa' loffs these days in Punterland, bless 'em. Our current fav in addition Ricky, Steve and Karl:

Little Britain
DVD
The brainstorm of just two average punters
.



Link to this entry
http://pokerpulse.com/news/viewtopic.php?p=2895#2895


Last edited by editor on Mon Sep 10, 2007 9:57 am; edited 2 times in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
editor
Site Admin


Joined: 09 Nov 2003
Posts: 2940

PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2007 9:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quick Service
Autograph Edition
Hardcover
By P.G. Wodehouse




Quote:
Joss Weatherby did the posters for Paramount Ham, a lean, cheerful, loose-limbed young man who bore up extraordinarily well under a task which might easily have soured one of a less ebullient temperament. This was probably due to the fact that he ate well, slept well and enjoyed a perfect digestion - in which respect he differed from his employer, whose alimentary canal gave him a good deal of trouble.

His course, as he headed for Mr Duff's private office on the second floor, took him past the fruits and vegetables, and though hampered by a large portfolio under one arm he was able with his free hand to collect a bunch of grapes and a custard apple while flitting by. The disposal of the last of the grapes synchronized with his arrival at the outer cubby-hole occupied by Miss Daphne Hesseltyne, Mr. Duff's secretary.

"Good morning, young Lollipop," he said courteously.

"Good evening," said Miss Hesseltyne, who had a great gift for repartee. "This is a nice time for coming in. You were supposed to be here at ten."

"I unfortunately overslept myself this morning. A man took me to one of those charity gambling places last night. You will be glad to hear that I cleaned up in a crap game. Have a custard apple? It's on the house. The fruit and veg. department has just given of its plenty." (From Chapter 2 at pgs. 15-16)


Wodehouse Playhouse
Series 1-3
With the excellent John Alderton and Pauline Collins
DVD (Region 1)




Link to this entry
http://pokerpulse.com/news/viewtopic.php?p=2993#2993
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
editor
Site Admin


Joined: 09 Nov 2003
Posts: 2940

PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2007 1:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Italian Boy
Murder and Grave Robbery
in 1830s London

Hardcover
By Sarah Wise




Quote:
Three months hard labor was for: anyone found sleeping in the open air with no visible means of subsistence and unable to give a good account of himself or herself; anyone asking for charity under false pretences, or showing wounds or deformities to gain alms; itinerant fortune-tellers and palmists; anyone betting or gambling in a public place; anyone selling or exposing to view an obscene picture or exhibition; any man found indecently exposing hemself 'with the intent to insult any female'; any man who deserted his wife and/or family, leaving them dependent on parish relief; anyone carrying implements that could be used for burglary; and 'every suspected person or reputed thief, frequenting any River, Canal, or navigable Stream, Dock or Basin, or any Quay, Wharf or Warehouse near to or adjoining thereto, or any Street, Highway or Avenue... with intent to commit Felony.' (footnotes omitted) (From Houseless Wretches Again, p. 113)


More about hard labor in Victorian prisons at p. 132 of the searchable Oxford History of Prisons helpfully posted online.

Link to this entry
http://pokerpulse.com/news/viewtopic.php?p=3095#3095
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
editor
Site Admin


Joined: 09 Nov 2003
Posts: 2940

PostPosted: Sat Dec 08, 2007 1:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Paris 1919
Six Months that Changed the World
Paperback
By Frostback history champ Margaret Macmillan




Quote:
Lloyd George like to talk of his origins in a humble cottage, but in fact he came from the educated artisan class. His father, who died when he was very young, was a schoolmaster; the uncle who brought him up was a master cobbler and lay preacher, a figure of stature in his small village. Wales was always important to Lloyd George as a reference point, if only to measure how far he had come, and also for sentimental reasons (although he grew quickly bored if he had to spend too much time there). He had early on seen himself on a larger stage. And what larger stage than the capital of the world's biggest empire? As he wrote to the local girl who became his wife, "My supreme idea is to get on."

He was fortunate in his uncle, who gave him unstinting devotion and support. When, as a boy, he discovered that he had lost his belief in God, the lay preacher forgave him. When he decided to go into the law, his uncle worked through a French grammar book one step ahead of him so that he could get the language qualification that he required. And when he decided to go into politics, a huge gamble for someone without money or connections, his uncle again supported him. The old man lived just long enough to see his nephew become prime minister. (footnotes omitted) (From Lloyd George and the British Empire Delegation, p. 39)


Link to this entry
http://pokerpulse.com/news/viewtopic.php?p=3237#3237
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
editor
Site Admin


Joined: 09 Nov 2003
Posts: 2940

PostPosted: Sat Dec 08, 2007 3:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Paris 1919
Six Months that Changed the World
Paperback
By Frostback history champ Margaret Macmillan




Quote:
At the end of November 1918, a dark, handsome young man who claimed with some justification, to speak for the Arabs boarded a British warship in Beirut bound for Marseille and the Paris Peace Conference. Feisal, descendant of the Prophet and member of the ancient Hashemite clan, was clever, determined and very ambitious. He was also dazzling. No matter that he had been brought up in Constantinople; he was everyone's image of what a noble desert Arab should be. Lansing, normally so prosaic, thought of frankincense and gold. "He suggested the calmness and peace of the desert, the meditation of one who lives in the wide spaces of the earth, the solemnity of thought of one who often communes alone with nature." Allenby, the tough old British general, saw "a keen, slim, highly strung man. He has beautiful hands like a woman's; and his fingers are always moving nervously when he talks," With "the cavalry of St. George" (gold sovereigns), British weapons and advisers, Feisal had led an Arab revolt against the Turks.

The British had gambled in backing him, and in so doing they had given undertakings that sat uneasily with that other set of promises in *Sykes-Picot. (From Chapter 27, Arab Independence, pg. 387)


Quote:
*Note: "The agreement is seen by many as a turning point in Western/Arab relations, creating the animosity that we see today, as the Kurds under Russia, the Shiites under France, and the Sunnis under Britain, broke out into mass regional war, provoking the Treaty of Versailles, which led to WWII," according to Dr. Jane Wykowsky of Harvard. It negated the promises made to Arabs[2] through T.E. Lawrence for a national Arab homeland in the area of Greater Syria, in exchange for their siding with British forces against the Ottoman Empire. (From Wikipedia)


Lawrence of Arabia
DVD




Link to this entry
http://pokerpulse.com/news/viewtopic.php?p=3241#3241
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
editor
Site Admin


Joined: 09 Nov 2003
Posts: 2940

PostPosted: Sat Dec 08, 2007 3:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Paris 1919
Six Months that Changed the World
Paperback
By Frostback history champ Margaret Macmillan




Quote:
Gertrude Bell was the only woman to play a key figure in the peace settlements in her own right. Thin, intense, chain-smoking, with a voice that pierced the air, she was accustomed to being out of the ordinary. Although she came from a rich, well-connected family, she had broken with the usual pattern of her class - marriage, children and society - by going to Oxford and becoming the first woman to receive a first-class degree in history. She climbed the Matterhorn and pioneered new routes in the Alps. She was a noted archaeologist and historian. She was also arrogant, difficult and very influential. In November 1919, when the British commander-in-chief in Baghdad held a reception for eighty notables, they left their seats to crowd around her.

With only her servants and guides for company, Gertrude Bell had traveled all over the Middle East before the war, from Beirut to Damascus and from Baghdad to Mosul. She loved the desert: "Silence and solitude fall around you like an impenetrable veil; there is no reality but the long hours of riding, shivering in the morning and drowsy in the afternoon, the bustle of getting into camp, the talk around Muhammad's fire after dinner, profounder sleep than civilization contrives, and then the road again. By 1914, she was widely recognized as one of Britain's leading work for British military intelligence and the only woman officially part of the British expedition to Mesopotamia.

... She loved passionately but never married. When her first great love turned out to be a gambler, her father refused his permission, and her second was already married. (footnotes omitted) (From Chapter 27, Arab Independence, pg. 399)


Link to this entry
http://pokerpulse.com/news/viewtopic.php?p=3242#3242
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    The Roll and Shuffle Forum Index -> The Roll and Shuffle All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next
Page 3 of 5

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
GoldMinerPulse
LegalAtPokerPulse
The Roll and Shuffle
Online Gaming Public Companies


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group

 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   FAQFAQ   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in