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editor
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 18, 2005 9:18 am    Post subject: Bingo Reply with quote

WELCOME!
Bingo
:

Quote:
WELCOME to Vancouver, B.C., Canada, home of Winter Olympics 2010 - surf's - ugh - up!


This just in from CBC Radio One's Early Edition, an otherwise underfunded, low-rent news program largely the product of a retired sports reporter, which is probably all this failed housing community of leaky condos perpetually under tarps deserves:

Quote:
Bingo 'bust' on Galiano Island
Last Updated Feb 18 2005 07:56 AM PST
CBC News

Quote:
VANCOUVER – Some residents of Galiano Island are upset over a recent undercover sting operation targeting a small bingo game at a local restaurant.

Two officers with the B.C.'s Gaming Policy and Enforcement Branch showed up at Deb McKechnie's restaurant last week during the weekly bingo session, claiming to be interested in real estate.

They watched the locals play, but didn't say or do anything to stop the game. The pair stayed overnight at a local B and B, showing up at McKechnie's apartment the next day, with the police in tow...

Solicitor General Rich Coleman says his officers had to investigate because a complaint was laid (emphasis ours). And he says there was no way to check it out except by travelling to the island.

"I'll certainly look and see how things were handled, but you know when we get a complaint from the public with regards to gaming, we take it pretty seriously," says the minister.



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PostPosted: Fri Feb 18, 2005 9:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Dead Dog Cafe Comedy Hour
By Thomas King
The Complete First Season
Featuring Blackout Bingo
Audio Cassette




Quote:
Enjoy a warm bowlful of Gracie Heavy Hand's famous puppy stew while host Jasper Friendly Bear calls out the latest number in the never-ending, unwinnable game of Blackout Bingo. This is Frostback First Nations fringe humor at its finest, a creation of poor, beleaguered Tom King, who introduces the show and pays for it by footing Jasper's coffee tab and allowing himself to be the butt of every slapstick and crypto-white guy joke running.

Sadly, the last episode of this first-rate CBC Radio series ended several years ago after only four seasons, but it gave the creator a well-deserved leg up the literary totem pole, so to speak. See below. See also story and cast photos in Comic genius or 'niggers' in redface? by John Stackhouse of Nov. 9/01 at globeandmail.com.

At one point not that long ago, it was still possible to acquire a Dead Dog Cafe t-shirt designed by the legendary aboriginal artist Jane Ash Poitras. We have harangued CBC about this and will report back when they cave.


Still no t-shirts Jan. 15/08 but here's the Dead Dog resurrected:

Dead Dog in the City
Vol. 1-3
CD Audio




Also by Tom King:

or Hartley GoodWeather, King's alter ego

The Truth About Stories: A Native Narrative
CBC Radio Massey Lecture 2003
By Thomas King
CD Audio (Abridged)




Quote:
Editor's Note: While we're big King fans, this is one of the rare instances when an abridged version is more than sufficient. We appreciate that King was the first aboriginal lecturer in this prestigious series, but we nevertheless tuned out half-way through the first broadcast. Too much whining over ancient history, which has never been gentle to anyone. Too many masterpieces remain unfinished or unworked altogether, in our view.


Green Grass, Running Water
Paperback
Also by Thomas King




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PostPosted: Sun Mar 27, 2005 10:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Bingo Palace
Hardcover
By Louise Erdich




Quote:
I hit the concession, snag our soft drinks and come back, set them down, pull up to the table, and lay out my ticket. Like I say, my grandmother, she plays five, which is how you get the big money. In the long run, much more than even, she is one of those rare Chippewas who actually profit from bingo. But then again, these days it is her preferred way of gambling. No pull tabs. No blackjack. No slot machines for her. She never goes into the back room, never drinks. She banks all of her cash. I think I can learn from Lulu Lamartine, so I watch her close. (-- p. 61)


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 28, 2006 1:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

From Gambling First Nations Gambles:

Me Funny
Paperback
Compiled and Edited by Drew Hayden Taylor




Quote:
My sister was once asked, by a different but equally well-intentioned White Person, the other eternal question: "What do you people want?" The question was rather vague; it could have meant what do you women want or what do you parents want or what do you prison guards want or what do you volleyball players want or any number of other things that are part of Darla's identity. Could even have been about bingo. My sister took a wild guess, however, and figured this particular White Person was really asking, "What do you Indians want?" Darla happened to have the answer.

"What we want," she said, "is for you people to lighten up."

All together now:

These two Indians walk into a bar... You'd think one of them would have ducked.

(Fom How to be Funny as an Indian by Ian Ferguson at p. 132)


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2008 3:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

PokerPulse ESL Gambler's Guide to Children's Literature:

Matilda
Hardcover
By Roald Dahl




Quote:
Nearly every weekday afternoon Matilda was left alone in the house. Her brother (five years older than her) went to school. Her father went to work and her mother went out playing bingo in a town eight miles away. Mrs Wormwood was hooked on bingo and played it five afternoons a week. On the afternoon of the day when her father had refused to buy her a book, Matilda set out all by herself to walk to the public library in the village. When she arrived, she introduced herself to the librarian, Mrs Phelps. She asked if she might sit awhile and read a book. Mrs Phelps, slightly taken aback at the arrival of such a tiny girl unaccompanied by a parent, nevertheless told her she was very welcome. (From the chapter entitled, A Reader of Books, p. 12)


Quote:
Matilda
Audio CD
Narrated by British actor Ron Keith




A clear, well-enunciated narration by an experienced reader. Never syropy and nicely modulated.


Quote:
Matilda
DVD
A classic featuring the acting De Vitos
as the awful Wormwoods, parents of our
favorite prodigy




... AND it's controversial!

The New Yorker
Magazine Subscription
The Candy Man
What children see in Roald Dahl
By Margaret Talbot
July 11 & 18/05




Quote:
... Dahl’s books regularly show up on the American Library Association’s list of titles that patrons ask to be restricted from young children or removed from the shelves. In 1995, a mother attempting to expunge Dahl from elementary-school libraries in Virginia told the Washington Post that in his books “children misbehave and take retribution on adults, and there’s never, ever a consequence for their actions.” According to this surprisingly common critique of Dahl, to defy one adult—no matter how bad a person—is to defy us all.

In 1972, the Horn Book, a journal of children’s literature, published a screed against Dahl by Eleanor Cameron, a children’s-book author. “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory,” she charged, was “one of the most tasteless books ever written for children.” The book was not just about candy; it was candy, “in that it is delectable and soothing while we are undergoing the brief sensory pleasure it affords but leaves us poorly nourished with our taste dulled for better fare.” Dahl reviled television, but his book provided the same easy satisfactions: it was a fast-paced, plot-driven celebration of empty calories. The science-fiction author Ursula K. LeGuin wrote in to second Cameron’s criticism, though she had to admit that “children between eight and eleven seem to be truly fascinated” by Dahl’s books. Indeed, one of her own children, she regretted to say, “used to finish ‘Charlie’ and then start right over from the beginning (she was subject to these fits for about two months at age eleven). She was like one possessed while reading it, and for a while after reading she was, for a usually amiable child, quite nasty.” The books, LeGuin concluded, “provide a genuine escape experience, a tiny psychological fugue, very like that provided by comic books.”

In the nineteen-eighties, feminists lambasted Dahl for his supposed misogyny, focussing on “The Witches” (1983). In 1985, one critic called the book “a dangerous publication,” which bore a “striking similarity” to the “misogynistic” fifteenth-century witch-hunting text “Malleus Maleficarum.” It was a bizarre comparison. Dahl does write in “The Witches” that a “witch is always a woman”—but not that a woman is always a witch. The strongest, most appealing character in the book is the boy narrator’s cigar-smoking, tough-minded, and immensely loving grandmother.

Anti-Dahlism has been further fuelled by a 1994 unauthorized biography, by the British writer Jeremy Treglown, which presents a complicated, domineering, and sometimes disagreeable man. Dahl was “a war hero, a connoisseur, a philanthropist and a devoted family man who had to confront an appalling succession of tragedies,” Treglown writes. “He was also . . . a fantasist, an anti-Semite, a bully and a self-publicizing trouble-maker.” When his first wife, the actress Patricia Neal, suffered a severe stroke at the age of thirty-nine, he adopted a cruel-to-be-kind strategy—bullying, goading, and sometimes humiliating her into acting again. He was prone to eruptions of pique. In 1981, Robert Gottlieb, who was at the time the editorial director of Knopf, Dahl’s American publisher, severed ties with Dahl, citing his “abusiveness” to the staff. More than once, Dahl offered up anti-Semitic remarks; in 1983, he told a journalist that “there’s a trait in the Jewish character that does provoke animosity . . . I mean there is always a reason why anti-anything crops up anywhere; even a stinker like Hitler didn’t just pick on them for no reason.” (Such noxious sentiments, it must be said, cannot be found in his work for children.) And, in 1989, Dahl, who had no trouble waxing indignant about attempts to ban his own work, denounced Salman Rushdie as “a dangerous opportunist” after the fatwa was issued against him. Dahl’s personal reputation is justifiably tainted, but his work has been unfairly assailed. When it comes to literature for adults, we’ve mostly stopped judging a work by its author’s personal morality. Why should we hold children’s writers to a stricter standard?


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 13, 2009 2:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Trial & Retribution III
DVD




Quote:
Reporter: Mrs. Greenway, can I have a few moments? Won't take a second.

Mrs. Greenway: You were at the court.

Reporter: That's right. So tell me, what did you feel when you picked out Karl Wilding?

Mrs. Greenway: I went straight for number five. That's my number, you see. I'm a five-five girl. Born on the fifth of May. I always pick the number five. It's my lucky number. I got it right, too! That police officer told me I got it right after I picked him out. That's what I told them in court.

Reporter: Bet you play five at the bingo. Do you?

Mrs. Greenway: I don't play bingo, but I always have it on my lottery tickets.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 23, 2009 1:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bud the Spud
Frostback folkie Stompin' Tom Connors
Audio CD
Featuring Sudbury Saturday Night




Quote:
Sudbury Saturday Night



The girls are out to Bingo and the boys are gettin' stinko,
And we think no more of Inco on a Sudbury Saturday night.
The glasses they will tinkle when our eyes begin to twinkle,
And we'll think no more of Inco on a Sudbury Saturday night.

With Irish Jim O'Connel there and Scotty Jack MacDonald,
There's honky Fredrick Hurchell gettin' tight, but that's alright,
There's happy German Fritzy there with Frenchy getting tipsy,
And even Joe the Gypsy knows it's Saturday tonight.

Now when Mary Ann and Mabel come to join us at the table,
And tell us how the Bingo went tonight, we'll look a fright.
But if they won the money, we'll be lappin' up the honey, boys,
'Cause everything is funny, for it's Saturday tonight

The girls are out to Bingo and the boys are gettin' stinko,
And we think no more of Inco on a Sudbury Saturday night.
The glasses they will tinkle when our eyes begin to twinkle,
And we'll think no more of Inco on a Sudbury Saturday night.

We'll drink the loot we borrowed and recuperate tomorrow,
'Cause everything is wonderful tonight, we had a good fight,
We ate the Dilly Pickle and we forgot about the Nickel,
And everybody's tickled, for it's Saturday tonight

The songs that we'll be singing, they might be wrong but they'll be ringing,
When the lights of town are shining bright, and we're all tight,
We'll get to work on Monday, but tomorrow's only Sunday,
And we're out to have a fun day for it's Saturday tonight. Yeah

The girls are out to Bingo and the boys are gettin' stinko,
And we think no more of Inco on a Sudbury Saturday night.
The glasses they will tinkle when our eyes begin to twinkle,
And we'll think no more of Inco on a Sudbury Saturday night.

We'll think no more of Inco on a Sudbury Saturday night.


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